Michael R. Seringhaus

Michael Seringhaus is an associate in the Silicon Valley office of Latham & Watkins, where he focuses on patent litigation with particular emphasis in the life sciences, biotechnology and pharmaceutical fields.

Prior to joining Latham, Dr. Seringhaus received his JD from Yale Law School, where he was a Coker Teaching Fellow, executive editor of the Yale Journal of Law & Technology, a Knight Law & Media Scholar and an Information Society Project Fellow. He also received the Burton H. Brody Prize in Constitutional Law, the Nathan Burkan Memorial Competition Prize in Copyright Law and the Margaret Gruter Prize in Biology and the Law. He served as a judicial intern for Judge Timothy Dyk of the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and he clerked for Justice Craig Stowers of the Alaska Supreme Court.

Dr. Seringhaus received a PhD in Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry from Yale, where he worked with Mark Gerstein’s computational biology and bioinformatics group. Dr. Seringhaus’ research focused on computational models to predict essential genes; he also participated in the ENCODE pilot project to identify and analyze functional elements in the human genome. Dr. Seringhaus previously attended Trinity College, University of Toronto, graduating with a specialist degree in biochemistry and a minor in English literature, with high distinction.