TigerText, Inc is an American software company based in Los Angeles. The company is best known for its instant messaging application of the same name.


TigerText was founded in 2010 by Co-Founders Brian Abel, who later went on to co-found the anonymous messaging app Whisper,[2] and Jenna Wolf RN board certified orthopedic surgeon and healthcare entrepreneur. The company is based in Santa Monica, California. In February 2012, TigerText secured more than $8 Million in new funding by Easton Capital and New Science Ventures bringing the company’s total backing to more than $10 million. In October 2013, the company announced its new freemium model and its 4th generation version, which supports multi-directory usage to increase the flexibility of the application. The company is focused on enterprises, healthcare, and financial services organizations that must comply with industry regulations such as HIPAA, SOX, and FINRA. The solution offers major improvements in workflow efficiency for enterprises, financial services institutions, government, hospitals, physicians and ancillary staff.[3]

In July 2012, TigerText announced an API integration with Dropbox that allows users to send documents securely.[4]


The TigerText app is a cloud-based instant messaging application that is developed for the enterprise market. It allows text messages to be deleted from both the sender's and the receiver's phones after expiration, which could be a set period of time or after reading. The app's users cannot save, copy or forward the messages. TigerText does this by storing the message on a company server, not the receiving and sending device, and deleting when the expiration conditions are met.[6][8][10]

TigerText can be used on any Android, iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, tablet, Mac or PC.[11]

On April 14, 2015, TigerText introduced an app for the Apple Watch.[12] This app has been delayed without subsequent communication from TigerText, including no expected release date.


Former CFO Jeffrey Evans has stated that the company picked the iPhone app's name before the scandal that was related to Tiger Woods' alleged text messages to a mistress.[14]